Three Benefits Of Exercising Regularly To Mind

Exercise strengthens the muscles, but can also help you forge a stronger, healthier mind. Just six months of regular exercise can improve your mind. Here’s how.

The benefits of doing sport

Ask non-athletes why they do not get up to get moving, you will be entitled to many similar stories. They do not have time. They are not physically fit. They have too many aches and pains. And the most telling thing is that it’s just too late. Here are some improvements in your health that you will see in less than six months if you start exercising regularly.

1. Improved self-esteem

We talk a lot about self-esteem in children, but what about ours? Self-esteem or, in other words, how you feel, can play a significant role in your overall health and quality of life. If you feel good about yourself, you will undoubtedly lead a healthier life, stay active, socialize, and participate in group activities. All of this works, in a way, in a circular approach to preserve your health.

We now know that exercise helps to maintain or even improve self-esteem in older adults. One study measured changes in self-esteem among a group of overweight women aged 60 to 75 who participated in either a muscle building and stretching program or a brisk walking program for six months.

Both programs boosted the self-esteem of these people, even though the stretching and muscle building group showed more significant improvement. All women, however, felt better about their body image and strength. The message? No need to raise the heart rate to achieve a better feeling through physical exercise!

2. Better stress management

There is a reason why we advise people to walk when they need to “release the pressure.” All this pressure or stress triggers a cascade of chemical reactions meant to prepare you for running.

Your heart beats faster and stronger; your lungs absorb more oxygen; your liver releases glucose to provide energy to the muscles, and your immune system goes into “injury preparation” mode. If you sit, however, all this physiological energy has nowhere to go.

Given the kind of chronic stress that most of us experience, this “ready to take off but no real destination” type of permanent response degrades the central systems of the body over time.

The immune system is eliminated; bone loss, muscle weakness and atherosclerosis increase, insulin levels progress (you need more insulin for glucose to go into the cells), leading to higher levels of abdominal fat is dangerous.

3. Reducing the effects of depression

The researchers took 156 people between the ages of 50 and 77 who had been diagnosed with specific depression and randomly divided them into three groups: a group Exercise (30 minutes of cycling, walking or running three times per day). Week), a Drugs (Prescription Prescription) group, and a group that combines both.

After 16 weeks, all three groups demonstrated similar improvements in depression, but only the Exercise group also improved cognitive abilities. Also, when the researchers performed verifications of participants six months after the end of the study, they found much lower relapse rates in the Exercise group than in the Drugs group.

Start playing sports

Running or climbing stairs for about 20 minutes does more to relieve stress-induced anxiety than merely sitting in a quiet room for 20 minutes. Not only does physical activity reduce anxiety, but being in good physical shape acts as a buffer on the harmful effects of stress, such as high blood pressure. We are not talking about a life devoted to physical activity, but only six months.

These activities can do more to reduce stress-related hypertension than a change in diet.

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